The Web's Best Cruise Destination
eSeaCruising.com.au eSeaCruising.com.au eSeaCruising.com.au

Search our eSea Deal Finder

Cruise Itinerary

Itinerary may vary by sailing date and itineraries may be changed at the cruise lines discretion. Please check itinerary details at time of booking and before booking other travel services such as airline tickets.

Odyssey, Iberian Sunsets & Canary Islands ex Rome to Lisbon

Ship: Seabourn Odyssey View ship details

Cruise Line: Seabourn

Selected Sailing Date: 17 Oct 2020

Printer friendly E-mail a friend

Category Pricing

Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Cabin Twin Triple Quad Single
A - Oceanview Suite N/A N/A N/A
A1 - Oceanview Suite N/A N/A N/A
V1 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V2 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V3 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V4 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V5 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V6 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
SA - Suite N/A N/A N/A
SV - Suite N/A N/A N/A
PH - Penthouse Suite N/A N/A N/A

** Pricing is Per Person, including all taxes.

* Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Please note: while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

Cruise Description

21 Night Cruise sailing from Rome to Lisbon onboard Seabourn Odyssey.

Seabourn Odyssey is the first in a new-class of ships for Seabourn that will accommodating just 450 guests in 225 luxury suites. Although, at 32,000 GRT, Seabourn Odyssey is more than triple the size of Seabourn Pride, Seabourn Spirit and Seabourn Legend, she was the smallest new ship being built by any major cruise line, and her guest capacity is just twice that of the smaller sisters, creating the highest space-per-guest ratio in the industry.

Highlights of this Cruise:

Civitavecchia (Rome), Italy
Originally built by Emperor Trajan who had a villa here, Civitavecchia has flourished as a major port for Rome since the 13th century. Today it is an important ferry terminal and for many travelers the gateway to the Eternal City, Rome. The Renaissance fortifications that surround the harbor area were begun by Bramante and completed by Michelangelo in 1535.

Livorno (Florence/Pisa), Italy
Livorno is the gateway to the region of Tuscany, which as Goethe once observed, looks like Italy should. Fortunately for today's visitor not much has changed in the two centuries since the German poet was himself a tourist in Toscana. The remarkable wealth of beauty here mellowed to a golden patina by history and tempered by the hand of man, awaits. Everywhere there is history, from the Etruscan stronghold of Fiesole, to the Roman colony of Volterra to the Renaissance splendor of Florence, Pisa, Sienna and San Gimignano. If the landscape evokes a sense of the familiar it is because the great masters have used it as a backdrop for their great works. Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci were archtypal Tuscans and Renaissance men who headed an extensive list of geniuses who lived, worked and created within a single period of time.

La Joliette (Marseille), France
Marseille is the second largest city in France after Paris. It is also one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the Mediterranean. Cave paintings in the nearby Calanques are estimated to be 30,000 years old, and remains of brick habitations date from 6,000 BCE. The more recent history begins with a Hellenic port in about 600 BCE, some remains of which are on view at the city’s History Museum. It has been one of the world’s major seaports almost from its founding, and served as the main European terminus of the French colonial empire in Africa and the Far East. It is located in the Provence-Alpes-Cote d’Azur region and is the capital of the Bouches-du-Rhone department. On an island in the expansive bay of Marseille stands the prison of Chateau d’If made famous by the Alexandre Dumas novel “The Count of Monte Cristo.” The Vieux-Port with its atmospheric buildings and wharves is the area where visitors can search for the perfect example of the local specialty bouillabaisse, a rich fish stew containing at least three, and often more varieties of local fishes. Marseille’s newly renovated port at the venerable Joliette Docks is situated very close to the striking Cathédrale de la Major and the fascinating collections at the Museum of African, Oceanic and American Indian Arts.

Sete, France
The port town of Sete hugs the tiny Mont St. Clair, and is caught between the Mediterranean and the Bassin de Thau, a salt lake directly behind it. It is crisscrossed by numerous canals which link the lake to the sea, and connected by 12 bridges. Along the quay, renovated buildings provide a multitude of architectural details from the 18th and 19th centuries. The life of the town is found in its squares: Place Leon Blum, with its fountain and Wednesday morning flower market; Place Aristide, with its old fashioned bandstand; and Place de la Republique, with its huge retaining walls and vaulted loggias. Sete retains its historic purpose as a fishing boat haven for North African trade; the old harbor dates from the time of Louis XIV.

Palamos, Spain
Located at the foot of the mountains on Spain's rugged Costa Brava, Palamos boasts seven superb beaches, Iberian archeological remains from the year 6 BC, and the Church of Sant Esteve on the beach. Highlighting the town center is its 16th-century cathedral.

Palma De Mallorca, Spain
Spain's Balearic Islands are among Europe's most popular resort destinations. Mallorca is the largest and most developed of these islands. Rome and Carthage battled over this territory and portions of ancient Roman constructions still remain. Founded almost 2,100 years ago, the city of Palma de Mallorca, the island's busy capital city boasts a considerable store of history. Mallorca welcomes its visitors to an island, which can be both exciting and tranquil. The abundant sightseeing and sunshine are yours to enjoy.

Barcelona, Spain
Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is said to have been founded by the Phoenicians, and was once the rival of the powerful states of Venice and Genoa for control of the Mediterranean trade. Today, it is Spain's second largest city and has long rivaled, even surpassed Madrid in industry and commerce. The medieval atmosphere of the Gothic Quarter and the elegant boulevards combine to make the city one of Europe's most beautiful. Barcelona's active cultural life and heritage brought forth such greats as the architect Antonio Gaudi, the painter Joan Miro, and Pablo Picasso, who spent his formative years here. Other famous native Catalan artists include cellist Pau Casals, surrealist Salvador Dali, and opera singers Montserrat Caballe and Josep Carreras. Barcelona accomplished a long-cherished goal with the opportunity to host the Olympics in 1992. This big event prompted a massive building program and created a focal point of the world's attention.

Malaga, Spain
Often little more than a gateway to the Costa del Sol for sun-seeking vacationers, Malaga is a most interesting city in its own right. First settled by the Phoenicians, Malaga was held by virtually every ruling power in the Mediterranean at one time or another. Two Moorish fortresses, the 11th-century Alcazaba and the 14th-century Castillo de Gibralfaro still stand sentry above the harbor. Malaga was the birthplace of Pablo Picasso as well as the Malaguena style of flamenco. During your time here, you may wish to sample some of the sweet Malaga wine and excellent tapas for which the city is noted.

Tangier, Morocco
Situated just across the narrow Strait of Gibraltar from Europe, Tangier has long comprised a hybrid culture that is nearly as European as it is African. Standing atop Cap Spartel, one can gaze down on the place where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean. The “Hollywood” district where the foreign embassies have traditionally been located reflects the European influence. But ascending the hill above the waterfront, one enters the narrow, winding alleys of the Kasbah, the city’s oldest, most Moroccan section. Down the coast, nearby Tetouan retains a nearly untouched walled medina, with sections originally occupied by Andalusian, Berber and Jewish populations. It is small enough that visitors can explore it without risking becoming lost, making it a perfect choice as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Casablanca, Morocco
Casablanca, located on the Atlantic coast, is with 4 million inhabitants Morocco's largest city, and at the same time the largest port in Africa. Built on the site of ancient Phoenician Anfa, it remained a small fishing village for many centuries until the French arrived in 1912. Since then Casablanca has become a vast modern city, ever on the increase since Morocco's independence from France in 1956. A successful blend of oriental-style, white cubic dwellings with modern Moroccan quarters gives the city an interesting flair. Lovely beaches and attractive hotels make for a popular year-round holiday resort. To help understand Moroccan culture a visit to the Medina, the quaint old Moorish quarter, is a must for all visitors.

Arrecife, Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain
Lanzarote is the northernmost of the Canary Islands, often known as "volcano island." Its capital is Arrecife, a quiet town of about 30,000 inhabitants. Present day Lanzarote consists of two quite distinct massifs: Famara in the north, and Los Ajaches in the south, where centuries of erosion have sculpted abrupt cliffs and deep ravines, contrasting sharply with the smoothly rounded hills of the island's central region.

Santa Cruz De La Palma, Canarias, Spain
The island of La Palma is a UNESCO Word Heritage Biosphere Site, inscribed for its unique volcanic landscape and lush vegetation. The old town of Santa Cruz is an atmospheric port, with narrow, stone paved streets and many older buildings. Avenida Maritima has a particularly well-preserved stretch of typical Spanish colonial houses, painted in fruit hues with characteristic cantilevered, wood-fretted balconies overhanging from the first floor. There are two castles, the Castillo de Santa Catalina and the Castillo de la Virgen, and a high mirador overlooking the harbor. The Our Lady of the Snows church sits on a mountaintop a short way from town, and has a revered statue of the Virgin, an elaborate Moorish ceiling and a silver altar. Tours maybe offered touring the island’s volcanic peaks and the lushly forested calderas of the extinct volcanos.

Santa Cruz (Tenerife), Canary Islands, Spain
Tenerife is the largest of the seven main islands, which comprise the Canaries. Beyond its quaint whitewashed villages, the Canary Islands' eternal spring keeps flowers, fruits and vegetables growing year-round. From Tenerife, you can travel up through pine forests to Mt. Teide, Spain's highest peak.The Iglesia del Salvador’s Islamic Mudéjar ceiling is one of the best in the islands, and La Palma’s odd, erosion caldera called La Cumbrecita is a UNESCO Biosphere Site.

Funchal (Madeira), Portugal
The Madeira Archipelago, consisting of the islands Madeira, Porto Santo and Desertas, is situated in the Atlantic, about 400 miles from the African coast and 560 miles from Lisbon. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1419, Madeira, the largest of the islands, became of great importance to Portugal for its sugar production and later on for the cultivation of wine. The unusually temperate oceanic climate and extraordinary scenery had Northern Europeans flocking to Madeira as early as the 18th century to spend the winter months. The winning combination of high, rocky peaks, steep green ravines and waterfalls in the interior, with the flowering charm of Funchal still attracts nearly half a million visitors each year.

Lisbon, Portugal
The great period of "the Discoveries" accounted for phenomenal wealth brought back from India, Africa and Brazil by the great Portuguese navigators. Gold, jewels, ivory, porcelain and spices helped finance grand new buildings and impressive monuments in Lisbon, the country's capital city. As you sail up the Tagus River, be on deck to admire Lisbon's panorama and see some of the great monuments lining the river. Lisbon is one of Europe's smallest capital cities but considered by many visitors to be one of the most likeable. Spread over a string of seven hills, the city offers a variety of faces, including a refreshing no-frills simplicity reflected in the people as they go unhurriedly through their day enjoying a hearty and delicious cuisine accompanied by the country's excellent wines.


ga('create', 'UA-80708728-1', 'auto'); ga('send', 'pageview');