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Noordam, Far East Discovery, China & Japan Collector ex Singapore to Yokohama

Ship: Noordam View ship details

Cruise Line: Holland America Line

Selected Sailing Date: 17 Jan 2021

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Category Pricing

Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Cabin Twin Triple Quad Single
MM - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
N - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
M - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
L - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
K - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
J - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
I - Interior Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
H - Large Oceanview Stateroom (Obstructed View) N/A N/A N/A
HH - Large Oceanview Stateroom (Obstructed View) N/A N/A N/A
G - Large Oceanview Stateroom (Obstructed View) N/A N/A N/A
F - Large Oceanview Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
E - Large Oceanview Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
DD - Large Oceanview Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
D - Large Oceanview Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
C - Large Oceanview Stateroom N/A N/A N/A
VF - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VH - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VE - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VD - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VC - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VB - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
VA - Verandah N/A N/A N/A
SY - Signature Suite N/A N/A N/A
SZ - Signature Suite N/A N/A N/A
SS - Signature Suite N/A N/A N/A
SC - Neptune Suite N/A N/A N/A
SB - Neptune Suite N/A N/A N/A
SA - Neptune Suite N/A N/A N/A

** Pricing is Per Person, including all taxes.

* Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Please note: while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

Cruise Description

27 Night Cruise sailing from Singapore to Yokohama onboard Noordam.

Named for the Northern compass point, Noordam embraces the latest industry and environmental technologies such as her use of a diesel-electric power plant for optimal energy efficiency and an Azipod® propulsion system that maximizes maneuverability.

On board ms Noordam you will discover museum-quality paintings such as an oil painting of the city of Utrecht painted in 1842, as well as contemporary art like the series of photographs of music greats Dizzy Gillespie and BB King. One of the most valuable pieces of furniture on board the ship is a remarkable inlaid chest flanked by carved wooden 17th-century Baroque columns. Made in Germany in 1885, the chest is inlaid with ebony and precious stones. Enjoy an onboard IPod® self-guided tour of the complete ms Noordam art collection. The ms Noordam exemplifies the classic style of ocean travel with contemporary amenities and modern enhancements.

Highlights of this cruise:

Singapore
City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore's urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community.

Singapore's food scene—which is arguably the world's most dynamic and runs the gamut from beloved street hawkers to Michelin-starred venues—would merit a trip alone, as would its never-ending shopping options. But the city is also packed with world-class museums, many designed by celebrated architects, and it hosts many major international events, such as the Formula One Grand Prix. Yet only about half of the 720-square-kilometer (278-square-mile) island is developed, which leaves plenty of room for parks and open spaces such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, where an old-growth forest still thrives.

Nathon (Koh Samui), Thailand
Koh Samui can feel like a screensaver landscape. As if designed by Mother Nature for posters, calendars and daydreams, it’s Thailand’s most famous island for a number of reasons. The beach-fringed coast is edged with vivid, blue water that’s a surf-and-sand playground for snorkeling, scuba diving, kayaking, building sandcastles and simply lounging. Along with busy food stalls and restaurants where you can find a whole world of cuisine made with local produce and fresh seafood as well as authentic Thai dishes, the lively streets are lined with bars, boutiques, markets and spas.

By contrast, the island’s interior can provide moments of reflection and replenishing solitude. Enter the dense, hilly jungles for hikes to ancient temples and pristine waterfalls and quaint villages where you can experience true Thai hospitality.

Laem Chabang (Bangkok), Thailand
Thailand, known as Siam until 1932, is the only country in Southeast Asia (and one of the few in the world) never to have been colonized by a European power. Its capital, Bangkok, reflects the country's unique status. It has embraced modernity on its own terms as the seat of a beloved monarchy that dates back to the 13th century. In this city, Buddhist temples and gilded palaces coexist with the bustle of one of Asia's major metropolises. The contrast between the golden glow of sunrise along the Chao Phraya River, which runs through the municipality, and the neon lights of downtown can feel intoxicating. There are few places in the world where you can spend the morning visiting a centuries-old stupa, have lunch at one of the world's top Michelin-starred restaurants and then shop for exquisite silk garments. And wherever you explore, you'll be struck by the warm welcome you receive. "The Land of Smiles" may be a cliché and a tourism-marketing slogan, but it's also a fitting nickname for Thailand.

Sihanoukville, Cambodia
Cambodia’s certainly most famous for the temples of Angkor, but travelers seeking to wander farther are flocking to the small-yet-bustling coastal town of Sihanoukville. Renamed in 1964 for King Norodom Sihanouk, this provincial port is home to some of the nation’s most stunning coastline and a downtown that's a blend of local businesses and a lively expat scene centered on Serendipity Road.

You’ll find not one beach but several, each with its own personality: good for whether you want a relaxed day reading a novel or one full of activity, food and people-watching.

Often described as the Thailand of 20 years ago, this region is less touristy but still able to meet your expectations for a perfect beach getaway. In Sihanoukville, you can take a guided snorkeling trip, kayak through mangrove forests, hike through a national park or horseback ride on the beach. Visitors in the mood for less action can spend time exploring the local temples or shopping near the beach. Angkor’s certainly amazing, but Sihanoukville might just be Cambodia’s most perfect, still-secret stop.

Phu My, Vietnam
The real draw of the port of Phu My is actually 80 kilometers (50 miles) away, in bustling, frenetic Ho Chi Minh City. Here, motorbikes hurtle down the wide streets and crossing the road is like a real-life game of Frogger. Its hectic pace is somewhat tempered by tranquil parks, peaceful pagodas and timeless alleyways.

Formerly known as Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City is a fascinating mix of high and low, old and new. On its streets, French-colonial architecture vies for attention with glistening modern skyscrapers; sleek designer malls sit alongside bustling local markets; and glamorous fine-dining restaurants are just around the corner from street-food stalls. The best way to explore the city is on foot. Most major tourist venues are in compact District 1, which is easy to get around. Or hop on the back of a xe om (motorbike taxi) to see the city like a local. Whatever you choose to do, you’ll be swept along in the pulsating energy of it all.

Da Nang (Hue), Vietnam
Located halfway between Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the port city of Da Nang has a small-town charm despite its lack of big-ticket attractions. It is home to a stunning 30-kilometer (18-mile) coastline that is popular for water sports such as waterskiing, paddleboarding and surfing. It’s also known for its great street food—and an extremely quirky bridge that you can't miss. The place was previously occupied by both the French and the Americans (this was the first place U.S. Marines landed in March 1965), and vestiges of both can be seen in the city, from the remnants of the vast U.S. air base and hospital to the city’s wide boulevards and old villas.

Da Nang is a great launchpad for day trips, whether to the picturesque city of Hoi An to the south, the old imperial capital of Hue to the north, or the majestic Marble Mountains to the southwest. The UNESCO-protected Champa temple complex, My Son, which lies 69 kilometers (43 miles) southeast, is definitely worth the trip—but for those who don’t want to leave the urban environs, many of the ruins have ended up at Da Nang's excellent Museum of Cham Sculpture, where you can learn all about the history and architecture of this fascinating culture.

Halong Bay, Vietnam
Like a combination of Thailand's famous limestone islanded Phang Nga Bay and old Hong Kong's harbor with its dragon-sailed junks, Vietnam's Halong Bay is fast making its way to the top of everyone's Asian must-see travel list. The bay and its almost two thousand islands were declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994 giving an official stamp of recognition to this natural wonder that has captivated painters and poets for centuries. Halong City has several markets and restaurants worth visiting, and is also a convenient base before setting out for places like Cat Ba Island and some of the smaller islets with their underground caves and biodiverse wildlife. As you sail the bay or look at it from the mainland, you may feel like you've stepped into a postcard or a painting from the classic era of Vietnamese art.

Some travelers come here for active days filled with kayaking, caving and islet-hopping but you can also sit back and simply sail through this stunning bay or take a day trip to fishing villages with their colorful markets. If you are up for venturing farther afield, it's a three-hour trip (each way) to Hanoi but worth the effort if you have yet to visit the city.

Hong Kong, China
Among the world's most glamorous and cosmopolitan cities, Hong Kong sits on the southern coast of China at the Pearl River estuary of the South China Sea. It comprises Hong Kong Island, where the Central Business District and most affluent areas and attractions are, and, on the mainland, Kowloon and the New Territories. Hong Kong is a regional and global hub for banking, shipping, fashion and food, boasting more than 60 Michelin-starred restaurants. Its five-star hotels are among the most elegant to be found anywhere; many are set in the towering skyscrapers that carpet Hong Kong Island's steep slopes and light up its skyline so beautifully.Officially known as Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong maintains a high degree of autonomy relative to the rest of China, even after it was reunified with China in 1997 after 156 years of British rule ended.Many cruises in Southeast and East Asia start or end in Hong Kong, and it's definitely a great city in which to spend a day or two sightseeing and finding cultural things to do before or after the voyage. Smaller cruise ships can dock right in Victoria Harbour, for front-row seats of the stunning skyline. Unfortunately, pollution is a problem, and sometimes the views are obscured because of it.

Shanghai, China
Shanghai is one of Asia’s most dynamic cities, and one of juxtapositions. It’s divided in two by the Huangpu River—to the west is Puxi and to the east Pudong. Puxi is the city’s downtown and its historic center; on this side of the river, much of the city was historically divided into the famous foreign concessions, and it’s here that much of the shopping, dining and nightlife is concentrated today. Shanghai has more than 30,000 restaurants, from humble soup dumpling spots to formal affairs helmed by Michelin-starred chefs. Its museums, particularly the Shanghai Museum with its 120,000-strong collection of antiquities, are equally impressive. Pudong is where the city’s major skyscrapers stand, among them the Jin Mao and Oriental Pearl towers.

Nowhere is Shanghai’s rich history and bright future more evident than along the Huangpu River. Stand on the Puxi side and, with the Bund—along which curve Shanghai’s stately early-20th-century heritage buildings—behind you, you can gaze across the river at some of the world’s tallest buildings, soaring skyscrapers that glow nightly, their lights reflected in the river.

Nagasaki, Japan
Situated in the northwest of Kyushu, the third-largest island in Japan, Nagasaki is one of the country’s most cosmopolitan port cities, with a decent tourism infrastructure, a fascinating past that stretches back to the early 7th century and a picturesque harbor that’s been an active port since the 16th century. Home to around 500,000 residents, the city is a buzzy yet relaxed place with abundant services, shops and restaurants as well as several cultural and historic attractions that are easily explored on foot and via public transportation. Check out the Nagasaki Peace Park and Atomic Bomb Museum, which outline the horrific bombing of the city during World War II while making a poignant pledge for world peace. Foodies will enjoy the wide variety of tastes to be found in Chinatown and the Shianbashi Gourmet Street. If you are visiting with children, the Huis Ten Bosch theme park—modeled on a medieval Dutch town—makes for a fun diversion. Look out, too, for popular annual events like October's Kunchi Festival and the wintertime Nagasaki Lantern Festival.

Jeju (Cheju) City, South Korea
Jeju, formerly Cheju, may not be familiar to most Americans, but for Korean travelers the country’s largest island and home to one of 12 UNESCO World Heritage Sites is a popular destination. The island is roughly the size of Maui and has much in common with the Hawaiian islands. Like them, it is a volcanic island—it first emerged from the sea some two million years ago and the volcano Hallasan, which reaches a height of 1,950 meters, is the tallest peak in South Korea. It also shares the mild subtropical climate of Hawaii—even in winter, temperatures rarely drop below freezing—and offers a similar broad range of activities whether in the warm ocean water or exploring the island’s interior on well-marked and maintained trails.

Jeju has long been known as the "Island of Gods" after a legendary lost race from whom the island’s inhabitants are said to have descended. Perhaps this history helps explain the super-human feats of the haenyeo, women divers who harvest abalone from the sea floor without the use of scuba gear. Remarkable giants can still be spotted here with humpback and orca whales common in this part of the East China Sea.

Busan (Pusan), South Korea
South Korea’s second-largest city (after the capital, Seoul), Busan is located in the southeastern corner of the country along the Sea of Japan. It combines a vibrant, big-city atmosphere with a famously laid-back attitude and subtropical landscapes. Often described as the "San Francisco of Korea," thanks mainly to its hilly terrain and close-knit neighborhoods, it offers visitors a little of everything: fashionable boutiques, dynamic culture and buzzy nightlife, as well as sandy beaches, hot springs and nearby mountains crossed with hiking trails and dotted with temples. Cultural highlights include the Gamcheon Cultural Village; the spectacular Haedong Yonggungsa Temple, built into the side of a cliff; and Art Street in Sinchang-dong, which hosts art competitions, exhibitions and cultural events such as the annual Busan International Film Festival. Those who enjoy hiking can explore the famed cliffs of Taejongdae Park, while the white sand beaches at Gwangalli and Haeundae are ideal places to relax by the seashore. Foodies will love Busan, too, not just for its excellent restaurants but also for the many atmospheric markets: the low-key Millak Hoe Town Market, tourist spots like Jagalchi Fish Market and the market at Haeundae with its ramshackle stalls selling gukpab (a traditional rice soup).

Yokohama (Tokyo), Japan
Until the mid-19th century, Japan lived in isolation, closed off from the rest of the world, and Yokohama was a mere fishing village. But in 1853, American naval officer Matthew Perry demanded the country open to foreign trade, and Yokohama was changed forever. The city quickly emerged as an international trading center, and while today it is often overshadowed by nearby Tokyo, it continues to be one of Japan’s liveliest, and most international, destinations. With its microbreweries and international restaurants, Yokohama has a decidedly different feel from many other Japanese cities.

From Yokohama, it’s a quick trip to peaceful Kamakura, home to Daibutsu, Japan’s second-largest bronze Buddha, and to the important Shinto shrine Tsurugaoka Hachimangu. Head to Hakone National Park on a clear day and you’ll be rewarded with picture-postcard views of majestic Mt. Fuji.

Tokyo is the largest city on earth and packed with some of the world’s best shops, museums and restaurants, big and small. While the bright neon lights and the bustle of contemporary Tokyo may be what comes to mind when you think of the city, there is another side. Tokyo's historic gardens and neighborhoods of traditional homes on narrow lanes speak to a timeless Japan that has survived into the 21st century.


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